High Fashion Struggles to Stay Relevant in a Fast Fashion World

Despite my judgement of high fashion (and therefore generally expensive) clothes on my blog, about 80% of my wardrobe is second-hand from Goodwill stores. It's the ultimate balance: cheap but good quality. (I dress better and pay less than if I shopped at normal stores.) Plus, it keeps me away from the vicious lures of trends and guides me to a more classic style. I have to search and sift to achieve a look instead of just having one thrown at me. 

On my most recent trip to my local Goodwill, I was pleasantly surprised by three racks labelled with signs stating that those clothes were from the Net-a-Portêr warehouse located nearby. You can only imagine how the heart of a high fashion enthusiast and admirer would leap at this sight. Keep in mind I've been rummaging for clothes at thrift stores and now the clothes I've been gazing at from a computer screen were right in front of me. Sounds like a dream, right? Well, it was, at least at first. In bliss I spent a good fifteen minutes sorting through the racks, picking through every single piece of clothing, giving (I admit reluctantly) special attention to the impressive labels and brands. But what fashion insider who's an outsider to the actual clothes wouldn't? I mean, Isabel Marant, Missoni, Suno, Valentino, and Giambattista Valli were just some among the names. Browsing these labels was like flipping through Vogue.





Once I got past the weight of the labels, I began actually looking at the clothes. Due to the fact that these were the ones that were removed from the warehouse, these clothes were either in unusual sizes (really big or really small!), ripped or damaged in some way, or just too ugly to sell. It was a collection of mistakes really. Every piece I tried on fit into one of these categories; a pair of white jeans from The Row stopped my circulation, I was floating in athletic shorts from Alexander Wang, while I couldn't even fit a Kenzo dress over my shoulders! The only things that actually fit me had some sort of design mistake, for example, a fuchsia eyelet shirt by Oscar de la Renta fit perfectly but it was faded in the shoulders because it was left out in the sun for too long, or a Band of Outsiders sweater that had a hole in it. (I ended up getting that sweater anyway - it was just a tiny hole, I promise!) The most tragic example, in my opinion, was a Suno blazer that was in perfect condition and in my size; it just happened to look a bit... clownish to me. 

While I was stuffing myself into a dress that seemed to be made to fit only 10 year olds, my mother (a champion of brand-less comfort and quality) made a point along the lines of why would people bother with expensive clothes like these if a) they aren't comfortable; b) they quality isn't better; and c) you practically need a lady in waiting to get it on? The answer is simple; people won't. Who would pay extra for clothes with those faults when there's perfectly stylish options out there? The logic is showing in the numbers: top high fashion brands like these are constantly losing money in a society of fast fashion. With more money people expect more, and these clothes aren't giving enough. 






I realize I'm judging the quality, aesthetic, and business design of high fashion clothes and brands off of the worst of the worst, but those clothes are still carrying the name and have an expectation to live up to it.


20 comments:

  1. Those racks sound like the stuff of dreams apart from the sizing! xx
    fashionismyfirstlanguage.blogspot.ie

    ReplyDelete
  2. I think it makes really sense to buy how you do this - so you get good quality for a good price :)
    xx from Germany/Bavaria, Rena
    International Giveaway: Zatchels Bag as Thank-You for the Supporter of my Hobby
    www.dressedwithsoul.com

    ReplyDelete
  3. Sophia, I really like this post. Always great to place value on how we spend our money. Good day and much success!

    Tinytiffs.blogspot.com

    ReplyDelete
  4. Wow! You got some amazing bits. It just goes to show that designer is just as dispensable as high street fashion. Great article xx

    Sophie Elizabeth
    www.popcornandglitter.co.uk

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks, that's just what I wanted people to take away from this!

      Delete
  5. I couldn't agree more! A designer name doesn't always equate to quality. I've found this to be especially true with designer shoes. Some brands are relying too much on their popularity and name, while loosing sight of craftsmanship.

    ReplyDelete
  6. It's sad that sometimes you only end up paying for the label, and its even sadder that there are a number of people who would do anything just to wear these brands - despite there being cheaper and sometimes better quality alternatives!

    Although that doesn't mean that designer brands are all bad :) Great post!

    http://glimmeringshadows.blogspot.com/

    ReplyDelete
  7. Love your honesty Sophia, a great piece of writing! We have similar stores here and in some you find what we call a load of tat. Having said that, we also have discount "villages" where you can actually pick up some good bargains

    Suze | LuxuryColumnist

    ReplyDelete
  8. Love your honesty Sophia, a great piece of writing! We have similar stores here and in some you find what we call a load of tat. Having said that, we also have discount "villages" where you can actually pick up some good bargains

    Suze | LuxuryColumnist

    ReplyDelete
  9. Well, I assume that the clothes that WEREN'T removed from the warehouse were a bit better, weren't they?:)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. They should be, but these clothes still carry the name and should live up to it. It's understandable if clothes get stained or ripped, but some of the quality and design flaws were really unforgivable!

      Delete
  10. Thanks:) I love your writing. Is there a chance to see you on your blog, or you chose to concentrate on writing only?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks! I mostly like to keep this blog as an escape away from myself and my life, but I will write about myself on occasion. (I'm not that interesting to write about!)

      Delete