Daria Werbowy in Porter Magazine

I am fiercely loyal to Vogue. I trust Ms. Wintour's editing, Ms. Coddington's photo shoots, Ms. Goodman's styling, and Mr. Bowles writing like no other. But recently I've been gravitating towards Porter, the magazine by Net-a-Poter. This is the type of magazine that makes your eyes tired, by forcing them to read and think out of pure interest, rather than simply glazing over the pictures. I look forward to each new issue of style, fashion, and culture in equal parts, centered around a main heroine: the covergirl. Porter is not one to chose the trendiest, it-girl of the moment, something I must admit Vogue is guilty of, instead only figures with longevity in their industry grace Porter's covers; Cate Blanchett, Lara Stone, Christy Turlington Burns, Karlie Kloss, and Natalia Vodianova, to name a few. When I heard (or rather, saw, on Instagram, that is) that Daria Werbowy would be the newest member of the Porter cover club, I was thrilled. Daria's face often represents more than the actual clothes she wears; she has an aura of elusiveness and simplicity, along with an understated sensuality (which is why she's such a perfect fit in her Céline campaigns.) 

But upon finishing the feature, I have to say, I was disappointed. And not disappointed because I had high hopes that were unrealistic, but because, rare as it is for Porter, they completely missed the mark. In this editorial, they decided to show the "two sides" of Daria through two separately themed photoshoots - one for the gritty and tomboy and the other for the more girly and sensual. While the photos themselves would be perfectly fine for another editorial, they have the right combination of curated clothes and ambiance, but in this case, they just didn't bring out Daria. The problem with featuring a model as the cover star is in the fact that they model the clothes and the scene rather than showing their personality as intended. These photos did not show Daria Werbowy at all; she was just doing what she does best by portraying a character. Daria's uniqueness is in the fact that she blends those "two sides" seamlessly so that they aren't really two sides, just one Daria. In the tomboy side of the story, she was shown fixing cars and making fires, with greasy, gritty makeup that is just so un-Daria, and in the girly side she was mostly nude with pastel accessories as a side note. Neither side shows the Daria that the written story makes her out to be.







 


Photos via Porter Magazine.

4 comments:

  1. I totally agree. Although she looks gorgeous in every one of these photos, I think Porter creating these images to represent her character was clichéd - and to be quite frank a little lazy. So unlike Porter. To be honest, I no longer buy Porter for the cover girl (as I did for the Gizelle and Gaga issues). It's the rest of the magazine that holds my loyalty.

    I do, however, feel as though they've slowly started to become more Vogue-like in some of their stylistic choices . We don't need more 'so hot right now,' what we need in the industry is more of the 'There is a woman, who...' - more mystery and integrity.

    The other features make up for this though. :)

    Great post.

    http://www.viewavenue.com

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    1. I totally agree - there wasn't any other piece in the issue that disappointed me, but the cover story did seem rather Vogue-ish.

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  2. You're right. Daria is one of my favorite models because she is so relatable. I think she hits a chord with a wide range of women evoking both a tomboy aesthetic and sensual woman. But these photos seemed off. I chuckled at the editorial with Daria painting the barn and fixing cars. But really, it was a missed opportunity to swoon over beautiful fall fashion worn by one of today's top muses.

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    1. The pictures were a bit comical and I agree with you that it was a missed opportunity. So unlike Porter!

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