Christopher Kane Spring 2016 Ready-to-Wear

The electricity of the present combined with the primitiveness if the past made for a pithy paradox of pastiche at Christopher Kane. The chunky, abstract shapes would appear to be the work of a primal artist, if it weren't for the crisp, exact edges and popping coordinated colors. Christopher Kane's fantasy woman rediscovered her roots this season, with slouchy knits and abstract doodles, but she didn't forget last season's identity in the process. This season's completely sheer, save for the primary colored trimmings on each panel of fabric, dress is the equivalent to last season's dress sewn strewn with limbs; perhaps this year's squiggles are the fictional, caveman artist's version of last year's limbs. The straightforwardness and rather bluntness of the shapes and textures in the show was refreshing compared to the busily-intricate, headache-evoking designs that London has been serving  for spring recently. 

The details, a well-placed cut-out of plastic, a set of coordinating scalloped edges, is what sets Kane apart. Unlike his London contemporaries at the moment, his collection at a glance is made up of strong ideas and craftsmanship, rather than a collection made up of tedious little details with no real overarching significance tying them all together. I'm not, however, sure if the mobility and slight ugliness of the shoes are a link to the past or present; an unsightly but practical accessory such as these would serve women well, both primal and present. In that way and many others, Kane is reminding us of the closeness we share with our ancestors, and the importance of keeping it that way. Kane's references are completely mixed in with his own ideas so that the end product is something entirely its own and new; directly linked to the past without looking it one bit. So much of modern art looks like the experiments of cavemen discovering paint for the first time, almost as if society is finishing a full circle by returning to its true, natural instincts; to be fully modern, you must be primal. While futuristic design can turn tacky quickly, there will always be something naturally appealing about primitive instinct, no matter how high-tech the methods we use to reach them may be.























Photos via Vogue Runway.

4 comments:

  1. Brilliant review as always! I really need to catch up with all the shows because schoolwork and rehearsals has definitely had a part in preventing me from going on vogue runway! x
    fashionismyfirstlanguage.blogspot.ie

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    1. I can totally relate - isn't it terrible how school clashes perfectly with fashion week? I use every second I can get to finish schoolwork so I have free time to keep in touch with fashion.

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  2. I always love Christopher Kane collections, which are unique and the techniques he employs are vastly different than any of his peers- however, I feel like this collection is a hodge podge of familiar motifs from Kane collections of season's pasts...
    What do you think?

    http://secret-hipster.blogspot.com/

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    1. The similarities definitely aren't very hard to search for, but I think in his case it truly is the development of his character.

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